Uncovered Texas

Texas Revolution


Harris, Dilue Rose

Dilue Rose Harris (1825-1914) is best known for her journal writings concerning events of the Texas Revolution. Her 30,000 word "Reminiscences" were published in the "quarterly" of the Texas State Historical Association, and have provided a valuable source of information about Texas at that time. Di....

Historical Marker - Columbus.


Colorado County, City of Columbus

Site of projected capitol of Stephen F. Austin's colony, 1823. First settlement at this point shown on Stephen F. Austin's map of 1835 as Montezuma. The municipality of Colorado was created by the provisional government of Texas January 11, 1836 and the town of Columbus ordered laid out as the seat ....

Historical Marker - Columbus.


Saint John's Episcopal Church

The earliest Episcopal worship service known to have been held in Columbus occurred in 1848. At that time services were held infrequently, conducted by clergy traveling through the area. The Rev. Hannibal Pratt came to Columbus in 1855, and Saint John's Parish was officially organized and admitted t....

Historical Marker - Columbus.


Gentry, George Washington

(1808 - 1883) A member of Stephen F. Austin's Colony, George Washington Gentry came to Texas in 1835 with his father and brother. Settling in what is now Washington County, he worked as a farmer and surveyor. He participated in the Texas Revolution, several Indian skirmishes, and the defense of San ....

Historical Marker - Comanche.


DeSpain Bridge

(Site 4.2 miles Southwest) Located where the Bonham-Jefferson Road crossed the South Sulphur River, this pioneer bridge served the area's rich cotton trade for some 20 years. It was constructed before 1850 by landowner Brig DeSpain and his neighbors to provide access to the county seat -- Tarrant --....

Historical Marker - Cooper.


Port of Corpus Christi, Early History of

Protected by offshore islands, the shallow waters of Corpus Christi Bay were a haven for smugglers before the Texas Revolution (1836). Commercial activity began when Henry L. Kinney (1814-1860) opened a trading post here about 1838. After the Mexican War (1846-1848), Corpus Christi became a departur....

Historical Marker - Corpus Christi.


Sidbury House

Charlotte Scott (Mrs. Edward D.) Sidbury (1830-1904), the builder of this house, was born in north Carolina and came with her parents to sterling Robertson's colony before the Texas Revolution (1836). She married John Wesley Scott in 1848; they moved to Nueces county, where he died in 1867. In 1875,....

Historical Marker - Corpus Christi.


Nueces County

Named for Rio Nueces (River of Nuts), its northern border. In 1519 Pineda, one of the first Spanish explorers, paused briefly in this area. Spain founded Fort Lipantitlan nearby in 1531. Post, named for an indian village, fell into Anglo-American hands in 1835 during Texas Revolution. Strategic valu....

Historical Marker - Corpus Christi.


Clapp, Elisha

The son of a veteran of the American Revolution, Elisha Clapp was born in Tennessee and came to Texas in 1822. He served in the army at San Jacinto in a cavalry company during the Texas revolution. He was in charge of a company of mounted rangers near his home on Mustang Prairie in 1836, and in 1837....

Historical Marker - Crockett.


Alford, George G.

(June 17, 1793 -- April 1, 1847) New York native George G. Alford, an officer in the War of 1812, came to Texas from Missouri in 1836. During the Texas Revolution he served as Gen. Sam Houston's quartermaster general. Captured by Mexican forces after the was while on a supply trip for the Republic o....

Historical Marker - Crockett.



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