Uncovered Texas

Prison


Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862

Facing the threat of invasion from the north and fearing a Unionist uprising in their midst, the people of North Texas lived in constant dread during the Civil War. Word of a "Peace Party" of Union sympathizers, sworn to destroy their government, kill their leaders, and bring in Federal troops cause....

Historical Marker - Gainesville.


Camp Howze, Site of

In operation from 1942 to 1946, Camp Howze served as an infantry training facility during World War II. It was named for General Robert Lee Howze (1864-1926), a native Texan whose distinguished career in the United States Army began with his graduation from West Point and included service in France,....

Historical Marker - Gainesville.


Cohen, Rabbi Henry

(1863-1952) Called the "First Citizen of Texas" by U. S. President Woodrow Wilson, Rabbi Henry Cohen, an internationally known humanitarian, was born in London, England. He came to Galveston in 1888 as spiritual leader of congregation B'Nai Israel and served for 64 years until his death. In 1889 he ....

Historical Marker - Galveston.


Scurlock Cemetery

This cemetery is named for North Carolina native William Scurlock (1807-1885), a veteran of the Texas Revolution, who is buried here. He and his brother Mial migrated to Texas in 1834 and constructed a log cabin in this vicinity. The following year they enlisted in the Texas Revolutionary army. Know....

Historical Marker - Geneva.


Texan Santa Fe Expedition

A dramatic chapter in administration (1838-1841) of Republic of Texas president Mirabeau B. Lamar. Aware of United States-Mexico commerce crossing Texas by the Santa Fe Trail near the Canadian River, President Lamar sought similar trade advantages for Texas. He initiated the Texan Santa Fe Expeditio....

Historical Marker - Georgetown.


Presidio de Nuestra Senora de Loreto de la Bahia

(Fort of Our Lady of Loreto of the Bay) One of the most historic Spanish forts in Texas. Popularly called Presidio la Bahia, it was founded on Espiritu Santo (present Lavaca) Bay in 1722. Twice moved, it was re-established here in 1749 to protect Espiritu Santo Mission (1/4 mi. NW). In the chapel is....

Historical Marker - Goliad.


Goliad

One of the three first Texas municipalities. Old Aranama Indian village called Santa Dorotea by the Spanish. Presidio La Bahia and Mission Espiritu de Zuniga established 1749. Here early events leading to the Texas Revolution were expeditions of Magee-Gutierrez, 1812; Henry Perry, 1817; James Long, ....

Historical Marker - Goliad.


Purvis, Capt. Hardy B.

(1891-1961) Born in Livingston. In his 20s, became a local peace officer. Spent years 1927-1933 and 1935-1956 in Texas Ranger service. Noted for coolness during danger in oil boom towns, dock strikes, prison riots, Purvis saw duty at Beaumont, Borger, Longview, Lufkin, and Fort Worth. Was captain of....

Historical Marker - Goodrich.


Hood County Jailhouse

Second county jail. Celebrated in early local Ballad. Built to succeed 1873 log jail at time when lawlessness was rampant. Main building is late victorian in style. Separate stone kitchen was added upon completion. The tall front section was to have a gallows, but no hanging have occurred here. Jail....

Historical Marker - Granbury.


Livergood, John Himes

(September 10, 1815 - October 3, 1893) A native of Pennsylvania, John Himes Livergood came to Texas in 1837 and received 640 acres of land on Peach Creek near Gonzales. From that time until Texas' annexation to the United States nearly ten years later, Livergood played an integral role in the defens....

Historical Marker - Hallettsville Vicinity.



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