Uncovered Texas

Prison


German POWs in the East Texas Timber Industry

The U.S. Army began building POW camps in the United States in early 1942 for captured Axis prisoners. During World War II, the Army shipped almost 425,000 military prisoners to 511 camps in the U.S. Approximately 50,000 of those POWs, primarily Germans, were housed in 70 Texas facilities ranging fr....

Historical Marker - Lufkin.


German POWs in the East Texas Timber Industry

The U.S. Army began building POW camps in the United States in early 1942 for captured Axis prisoners. During World War II, the Army shipped almost 425,000 military prisoners to 511 camps in the U.S. Approximately 50,000 of those POWs, primarily Germans, were housed in 70 Texas facilities ranging fr....

Historical Marker - Lufkin.


Shivers, Allan, Birthplace of

Born here, in now-razed house, Oct. 5, 1907, to Robert A. and Easter C. Shivers, pioneer East Texas family. As youth, worked at odd jobs to earn own pocket money. Was State Senator 12 years; Lieutenant Governor for two. A strong, progressive Governor, his term (longest in state history) was marked b....

Historical Marker - Lufkin.


Fort D. A. Russell

Originally named Camp Marfa, this installation began as a supply post for U. S. Army border patrol stations in 1911. It was a cavalry camp during the years of the Mexican Revolution. Renamed for Civil War general David Allen Russell, it became a permanent Army post in 1929. Deactivated at the end of....

Historical Marker - Marfa.


Fort D.A. Russell Building 98

Constructed in 1920, Building 98 housed the Officers Club and Bachelor Officers Quarters for Fort D.A. Russell. During the latter years of World War II, from 1943 to 1945, German prisoners of war from Field Marshal Erwin Rommel's Afrika Korps were housed at the fort, and evidence of their ornate art....

Historical Marker - Marfa.


Fraley-Garland House

Designed in the American four-square style with colonial revival detailing, this home was built for Clinton Virgil Fraley in 1896. A Confederate soldier captured and held in Union prisons during the Civil War, Fraley moved from his native Kentucky to Marshall in 1866. Here he served as deputy sherif....

Historical Marker - Marshall.


Todd-McKay-Wheat House

Todd-McKay-Wheat House Originally constructed before the Civil War and modified during the 1880s and again in 1909, this house is significant for its historical associations and for its representation as an evolutionary house form. In 1856, Mary Britt bought the property and married Judge William S.....

Historical Marker - Marshall.


Fort Mason and Camp Llano, C.S.A.

Fort Mason, located 5 blocks south, was headquarters for the first regiment Texas Mounted Rifles 1861-62. These Confederate troops occupied the line of old U. S. forts to give protection against Indians. 215 prisoners-of-war were confined here. In spring 1862, the line of frontier defense was tighte....

Historical Marker - Mason.


Whorlie Well

Named for a victim in famous "Hoodoo War", provoked by cattle rustling in Mason County. John Whorlie (or Worley), a deputy sheriff, on May 13, 1875, lost a prisoner to a lynch mob on Aug. 10, 1875, Whorlie was killed and scalped while working on this well. His killer was identified as Scott Cooley, ....

Historical Marker - Mason.


Berry, John Bate

(1813 - 1891) Forefathers resisting America's foes on many frontiers inspired John Bate Berry, who came to Texas from Kentucky in 1826. He fought (1835-36) in the Texas War for Independence and in the 1842 Mier Expedition to stop Mexican raids on the Republic of Texas. Captured, imprisoned, then fre....

Historical Marker - Mason Vicinity.



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