Uncovered Texas

Oil


K'Nesseth Israel Synagogue

In response to area population growth following the early 20th century Goose Creek oil field boom, twenty incorporating members formed the K'Nesseth Israel congregation in 1928 to serve the area's Jewish residents. They hired Houston architect Leonard Gabert to design this synagogue, which was compl....

Historical Marker - Baytown.


Humble Oil & Refining Company

Ross S. Sterling entered the oil business in 1909, when he invested in the Humble oil file north of Houston. Two years later he formed the Humble Oil Company with five partners: Walter W. Fondren, Charles B. Goddard, William Stamps Farlish, Robert Lee Blaffer, and Harry Carothers Wiess. Sterling's b....

Historical Marker - Baytown.


Hinchee, Caroline Gilbert

A descendant of a distinguished pioneer Connecticut family, Caroline "Carrie" Gilbert (1863-1913) was born in Beaumont. Educated at leading art institutions, she was an accomplished artist and art teacher. In 1900 she married Martin Luther Hinchee, an Illinois native who became a successful Beaumont....

Historical Marker - Beaumont.


Duke, Holmes, House

A native of Carthage, Texas, Holmes Duke came to Beaumont in the late 19th century and purchased property at this site in 1898. Construction on his home began shortly thereafter. Completed in 1899, the Holmes Duke house features influences of the Queen Anne and colonial revival styles of architectur....

Historical Marker - Beaumont.


Beaumont

County seat of Jefferson County. Settled in 1825 as Tevis Bluff; incorporated as Beaumont Dec. 16, 1838. Early trading post, riverboat port, lumber, rice and ranching center. Near site of Spindletop gusher, where oil became an industry, ushering in the modern port and shipyards, and a vast industria....

Historical Marker - Beaumont.


Lucas Gusher

Discovery well of the Spindletop Oil Field and the first important well on the Gulf Coast. It blew in on Jan. 10, 1901, flowing 100,000 barrels of oil a day from a depth of 1020 feet. The oil production which resulted made Beaumont a city and the Sabine District a major oil refining and exporting ce....

Historical Marker - Beaumont.


Club of Beaumont, Women's Clubhouse

Early meetings of the Woman's Reading Club, now the Woman's Club of Beaumont, were conducted in area homes, churches, and public buildings until 1909, when this two-story frame clubhouse was built. Constructed during the presidencies of Mrs. John B. Goodhue and Mrs. J. L. Cunningham, it was designed....

Historical Marker - Beaumont.


First National Bank Building

Founded on April 9, 1889, the First National Bank of Beaumont enjoyed an economic revitalization in the 1930s after the area's second major oil boom. A special meeting of the bank's board of directors was held on January 16, 1935, to discuss plans to erect a new building. Present at the meeting were....

Historical Marker - Beaumont.


First Security National Bank

Oldest bank between Houston and the Louisiana border. Organized on April 9, 1889, with capital of $100,000, as First National Bank of Beaumont, it was granted National Bank Charter No. 4017. First president was Valentine Wiess, a lumber man. Directors were W. A. Fletcher, John N. Gilbert, John L. Ke....

Historical Marker - Beaumont.


Young Men's Christian Association of Beaumont

The 1901 Spindletop oil boom brought vice, corruption and inadequate housing problems to Beaumont. H. G. Behrman, a young man who was sleeping in a tent in his friend's backyard, met W. M. Lewis, state secretary of the YMCA. Through their efforts, a community meeting was held Nov. 3, 1901, and the B....

Historical Marker - Beaumont.



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