Uncovered Texas

Missouri


Scobee, Barry, Mountain

(6300 ft. elev.) Camp grounds and lookout post (1850s-1880s) for military, mail coaches, freighters, travelers, emigrants. Site of area's last Indian raid, 1881. Part of John G. Prude Ranch. Named by Gov. John Connally Dec. 21, 1964, to honor Barry Scobee whose efforts were largely responsible for t....

Historical Marker - Fort Davis.


Smith, John Peter

A native of Kentucky, John Peter Smith migrated to Fort Worth in 1853. He worked as a teacher, clerk, and surveyor before his appointment as Deputy Surveyor of the Denton Land Department in 1855, for which he received payment in property. Also a student of law, he was later admitted to the bar. Alth....

Historical Marker - Fort Worth.


Mabry, General H.P.

A Georgian. Came to Texas 1851. Admitted to bar. Texas Legislator 1856-60. With Confederate expedition capturing Forts Washita and Arbuckle, Indian Territory, April-May 1861. June 1861 joined 3rd Tex. Cav. Helped win Wilson's Creek battle, in campaign to keep Missouri in Confederate fold. Late 1861 ....

Historical Marker - Fort Worth.


Saint Paul Lutheran Church

In 1892 the Rev. Johann Christian Schulenburg (1840-1922), a Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod missionary, conducted services in German at the Knights of Honor Hall in downtown Fort Worth. In 1896 the Mission was chartered as the Evangelisch Lutherische St. Paulus Gemeinde, and a chapel was erected on ....

Historical Marker - Fort Worth.


Saint Joseph Hospital

In the 1880s Fort Worth was a thriving railroad town. The Missouri Pacific Railroad Company established an infirmary near its headquarters to care for its employees. In 1885 the Congregation of Sisters of Charity of Incarnate Word, based in San Antonio, was asked to take over operation of the infirm....

Historical Marker - Fort Worth.


Smith, John Peter

Pioneer area settler John Peter Smith (1831-1901), who donated twenty acres for the establishment of this cemetery, came to Fort Worth from Kentucky in 1853. He served the community as a teacher, clerk, surveyor, and attorney, and became a noted civic leader. Although opposed to the secession of Tex....

Historical Marker - Fort Worth.


St. Andrews United Methodist Church of Fort Worth

St. Andrews United Methodist Church of Fort Worth In 1888, under the leadership of the Rev. James W. Moore, 15 men and women organized the St. Andrews Methodist Episcopal Church. The church rehabilitated a building on Ninth Street and within a decade had a parsonage for its minister. Church programs....

Historical Marker - Fort Worth.


Smith, E. Kirby Smith

(1824-1893) Born in Florida. Graduated from West Point. Fought in Mexican War. On the Texas frontier in the 1850s, commanded Camps Belknap, Cooper and Colorado. In 1860 and many years afterwards was a partner of J. M. Hunter of Fredericksburg in a Texas ranch. Resigned from U. S. Army, 1861, to serv....

Historical Marker - Fredericksburg.


Patton, Albert Lee

Missouri native Albert Lee Patton (1851-1934), trained as a tinsmith, moved to Fredericksburg in the early 1870s. In 1897 he constructed this two-story native limestone building adjacent to the east side of his general mercantile and hardware store. The ground floor housed the Citizens Bank until it....

Historical Marker - Fredericksburg.


Nimitz, Chester W.

Typical early Fredericksburg home built 1866 by Carl Basse. Property of the Henke family since 1873. Heinrich Henke, early settler, Confederate freighter had butcher counter on front porch; meat processing was done in back yard; there the horses that pulled meat vending cart were stabled. Shop later....

Historical Marker - Fredericksburg.



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