Uncovered Texas

Indian


Norman Springs & Norman Grove, Site of

William Balch (1804-1870) claimed land around this site as a member of the Peters Colony in 1849. When he returned with his family in 1851, they found a group of Caddo Indians camping on one side of the springs. The Balch family built their cabin on the other side and lived peaceably with their neig....

Historical Marker - Alvarado.


Huff Family Massacre

An atrocity of 1874, in one of last Wise County Indian raids. While C. W. Huff and son worked in remote part of land recently settled by the family, Indians killed Mrs. Huff and daughters, Palestine and Molly. Neighbors buried the scalped and mutilated victims in a wagon bed, in the grave. It is sai....

Historical Marker - Alvord.


Alvord, City of

By 1882, when the Fort Worth & Denver Railroad built a line to this area, a small agricultural community had developed here on an old Indian trail. First known as Nina, the town was renamed Alvord in 1883, probably in honor of J.B. Alvord, President of the railroad. Early businesses here included me....

Historical Marker - Alvord.


McBride Ranch House

A pioneer settler quarried Alibates dolomite from the canyon rim to build this house, mortared with lime burned on the site. Wood in ridge beams, door and window lintels, ice house, and corral came from old railroad bridge timbers salvaged from Canadian River. The floors are of masonry mortar. The b....

Historical Marker - Amarillo.


Canadian River

A travel route and dwelling site for over 12,000 years, the Canadian River supported stone and adobe Indian villages from the 12th to the 14th Centuries. This waterway was also one of the first interior rivers of the U.S. known to early explorers. Coronado, coming from Mexico, crossed the Canadian i....

Historical Marker - Amarillo.


Canadian River

A travel route and dwelling site for over 12,000 years, the Canadian River supported stone and adobe Indian villages from the 12th to the 14th Centuries. This waterway was also one of the first interior rivers of the U.S. known to early explorers. Coronado, coming from Mexico, crossed the Canadian i....

Historical Marker - Amarillo.


The First Ranch in Potter County

Established by W. H. Bates and D. T. Beals, Colorado merchants and ranchers on the Arkansas River since 1870. "Crowded conditions" there resulted in moving herd and brand to the Panhandle of Texas in 1877 -- three years after Indians were expelled from this region. LX cattle were being driven to Dod....

Historical Marker - Amarillo.


Amarillo Livestock Auction

Established to serve the first permanent industry in the Texas Panhandle--ranching. Now famed for handling more cattle than any other commission auction company in the United States. The years 1874-1878 saw Indians expelled, buffalo herds exterminated, and ranches established in the region. Longhorn....

Historical Marker - Amarillo.


Potter County

Named for Robert Potter, Secretary of the Navy (1836) and Senator (1840-42) of the Republic of Texas. In territory ranged by Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, and Kiowa Indians, and since 1600 familiar to Spanish military parties and French traders. On established routes of the Great Spanish Road....

Historical Marker - Amarillo.


Fort Worth and Denver City Railway, First Railroad Through the Texas Panhandle

Pioneered transportation in the old buffalo and Indian frontier and the open-range cattle empire. Organized by Fort Worth citizens. Although chartered by the Texas Legislature on May 26, 1873, the actual building was delayed by the money panic of 1873. Under General G.M. Dodge, civil engineer who ha....

Historical Marker - Amarillo.



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