Uncovered Texas

Civil War


James, Jesse, A Hideout

Jesse James, celebrated 1860s-1882 Missouri outlaw, used to visit in Archer City in house built by Stone Land and Cattle Company for its manager, Allen H. Parmer (1848-1927), his Confederate comrade of the Civil War and husband of his sister Susan (1849-89). With Frank James, his brother and aide, t....

Historical Marker - Archer City.


Camp Cureton, C.S.A.

Star and Wreath Strategically established during Civil War on defense line Red River to Rio Grande where Gainesville-Fort Belknap Road crossed west fork Trinity River about 10 miles south, 4 miles east of Archer City. Texas Frontier Regiment patrolled area frequently to check Comanche raids. Poorly ....

Historical Marker - Archer City.


Archer County Copper Mines

The civilized world first heard of copper in this area from Texas Rangers after an 1860 campaign against Comanches on the Pease River, about 100 miles to the northwest. The Ranger Captain, Lawrence S. ("Sul") Ross, later to serve Texas as governor, had nuggets picked off the surface of the ground an....

Historical Marker - Archer City.


Graham-Argyle Cemetery

This burial ground served the farming community of Graham which grew up here after the Civil War. First known interment was that of an infant, George Isbell, on December 10, 1865. An adjacent structure housed a school and Graham Baptist Church. After 1881, most of the settlers moved to the nearby to....

Historical Marker - Argyle.


Arlington Cemetery

Encompassing more than ten acres of land Arlington Cemetery includes within its borders several small historic graveyards, including the original old cemetery of Arlington, the W. W. McNatt Cemetery addition, the Masonic Cemetery, and the Old City Cemetery. William W. McNatt, who brought his family ....

Historical Marker - Arlington.


Six Flags over Texas

Flags of six different countries have been raised over Texas. In 1519 the land was claimed for Spain, whose explorers came later in search of silver and gold, but found buffalo, Indians and mirages. They planted the red and gold banner of Spain, with its lions and castles, beside the cross of the mi....

Historical Marker - Arlington.


Johnson Station Cemetery

Now part of Arlington, this area was established in the 1840s as a ranger station and trading post known as Johnson Station. This cemetery serves as a reminder of that early settlement. The oldest marked grave in the cemetery is that of Elizabeth Robinson, who died November 15, 1863. A number of unm....

Historical Marker - Arlington.


Handley Cemetery

This burial ground originally served the pioneer settlers of the Handley Community, which developed here soon after the Texas and Pacific Railroad built a line to the area in 1876. The earliest marked grave is that of Jane E. Thomas (1832-1878). A church building, constructed on adjacent land in 188....

Historical Marker - Arlington.


Ramsey, John M.

(1845-1925) A native of Alabama, John M. Ramsey served in the Confederate army during the Civil War (1862-1865). In 1867 he married Rebecca Alexander (d. 1885), and in 1870 they settled in Lee County, Texas. In 1889, after his wife died, Ramsey moved with his eight children to La Salle County, where....

Historical Marker - Artesia Wells.


Jackson, General

Gen. Barnard E. Bee, a Texan, gave him the famous sobriquet in first Battle of Manassas. Jackson was rallying his men for a charge as other units retreated. Bee, seeing him cried to his men, "There is Jackson standing like a stone wall. Let us determine to die here, and we will conquer." In Battles ....

Historical Marker - Aspermont.



Browse thousands of old postcards from around the Lone Star State. See how tourist and local folks shared their Texas story.


Explore the many missions, forts and presidios that explorers and soldiers constucted to settle the lands now called Texas.


Tour the history of Texas through the text of the thousands of historical markers found all across the Lone State State.


Discover the deserted, forgotten and abandoned towns of Texas. Some vanished over night while others slowly slipped away.