Uncovered Texas

Normanna


Jones Chapel United Methodist Church


This church, organized in 1888, was originally known as Jones Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church. At first, it was part of a circuit, and ministers often traveled by stagecoach or horseback as they rotated Sunday services among churches. Jones Chapel shared the Rev. J.T. Jacobs with Fannin Street Methodist Church in Goliad, and during its first year held services in a schoolhouse. In 1889, members built a sanctuary on land that Capt. A.C. Jones donated to three former slaves who served as trustees of the new church. Charter members included Classie Douglas, Ann Felix, Felix Garner, Lawson Green, Serena Hodge, Ellen Jones, Bell Lott, Leanna Lott, Mose Lott, J.J. McCloud, Carrie McCampbell, P.M. McCarty, Kimmie Nancy, Elvira Newton, Rebecca Simms, Wesley Simms, I.E. Starnes, George Steward, Katy Ware, Sam Ware, Harriet Williams and Mary Williams, and many of the church's early members were former slaves. Although members have remodeled and repaired the church several times over the years and have made additions, such as a bell tower in 1913, the church is still at its original location. The congregation remains active in Beeville's African American community. Members take part in Bee County's Juneteenth festivities and participate in a variety of programs, including outreach ministries to help youth and the economically disadvantaged. Members also aim to provide food and other necessities to shut-ins in the community. Even after more than 100 years, Jones Chapel fervently continues to serve the African American community in Beeville. (2006)

115 N Leverman St Beeville, Texas

Bee County

Year Erected: 2006

Marker Type: 27" x 42"

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